Archive for February, 2015

Alumni Spotlight: Irvin Scott

February 27th, 2015 by rimaal17

Name: Irvin Scott

Graduation Year: 2014professional pic (1)

Major: English

Industry: Financial Services, BNY Mellon and Acting, Eaux de vie Bluespark Collaborative Documentary

Favorite Class: Bible and Literature- Professor Kee and Cording

Campus Involvement: Interdenominational Services, BSU, D1AA Varsity Football

College Internship/Work Experience (if you were in Summer Internship Program, Academic Internship Program, other programs): Northwestern Mutual College Intern Program (Junior Year)

What were some of the most defining events/opportunities/aspects of your time at Holy Cross? My most defining moment was when I spoke at my class’ Holy Cross Baccalaureate Mass.

What is one thing someone should be certain to do before they graduate? There is no one right answer to this question, but I’d say receiving some professional exposure in whatever field you are looking to become involved in is essential. If you don’t know what particular field is, shop around, try things out but whatever you do, don’t sit around and wait.

What advice would you give to someone just starting out in your field? The financial service industry is extremely lucrative with an array of avenues you can go down. The most important thing to do is become familiar with the field you are looking to go into quickly. If it’s insurance, get certified as soon as possible. If it’s banking, get your securities license (Series 6, 7) early. Get your foot in the door early through internships. Reach out to Alumni in the financial service industry.

The acting is more of a hobby than a career, but getting involved after college is essential.

What skills have you found most useful in your professional life that you attribute from learning at Holy Cross?

My ability to learn new material is something I attribute from my Holy Cross education. You will notice that you are an anomaly in most work settings because of your natural intuitive skills. Being able to clearly articulate my thoughts is something I attribute to my background in English.

What is the most important advice you could give a student on obtaining an internship or a job?

Don’t put too much emphasis on landing the “BIG TIME” internship or job. Understand what your strengths and weaknesses are and see where you can be both an asset and sponge. Apply to as many companies as possible. Whether it’s an internship or a job, pick whatever company or industry you feel provides the most stability and education. There will never be a company that’s the absolute perfect fit but make the most out of every opportunity that presents itself. As I mentioned before, spend less time thinking about what you want to do and more time trying out what you think you want to do.

Alumni Career Spotlight: Meghan Summerson

February 20th, 2015 by rimaal17

headshot (1)Name: Meghan Summerson

Graduation Year: 2013

Major: English, with a Creative Writing Concentration and Pre-Med

Job: Marketing Operations Assistant at Scholastic

Industry: Publishing

Favorite Class: It’s hard for me to choose just one! I really enjoyed the upper level English classes I was able to take, particularly the seminar I did on Jane Austen. I also loved my courses focusing on 19th century British literature and all the Creative Writing classes. I had an opportunity to take Screenwriting and learned so much more than I ever thought I would about movies. I have to say Biology as well, just because it was always a passion of mine.

Campus Involvement: Student Health Awareness Peer Educators (SHAPE), Running Club, Sigma Tau Delta, SPUD

College Internship/Work Experience (if you were in Summer Internship Program, Academic Internship Program,other programs): I participated in SIP and did an internship with Nickelodeon for a TV show on Nick Jr. called “Team Umizoomi.”

What were some of the most defining events/opportunities/aspects of your time at Holy Cross?

Without SIP, I am not sure I would have ever moved to New York City. That program definitely shaped my life because I had the opportunity to try something completely new, and it was incredible. It gave me the push I needed to reach outside my comfort zone. From that point on, I knew I was going to New York after graduation. I knew I wanted to do something with education and children, and it ultimately led me to where I am today.

What is one thing someone should be certain to do before they graduate?

Make sure you have your resume ready to send out to potential employers. I would suggest also writing as many cover letters as you can and to take advantage of Career Planning. Have people read your resume and cover letters to get feedback. Before you know it, you’ll be sending out so many of these and you’ll want to feel comfortable and confident. The same thing also goes for interviews. Practice definitely helps! Go to networking events and look at the Career Advisor Network (it’s not so easy once you’ve graduated!). Even just talking to people about what they do might help you narrow down your own interests and aspirations.

What advice would you give to someone just starting out in your field?

Keep an open mind. Any position in publishing, whether it’s editorial or marketing, will teach you so much about the industry. If you’re not sure where exactly you want to be, just apply to everything and go from there. There’s so much opportunity for movement in publishing, and you can really do anything (online game design included!). If you can, try to find a mentor in another department. Their insight and advice will be so valuable to you. Learning about the industry from their perspective will not only broaden your understanding of publishing, but it will help you discover what you might ultimately be interested in.

What skills have you found most useful in your professional life that you attribute from learning at Holy Cross?

Project management is a huge part of my job, and I learned that just from juggling my own homework, activities, and personal life at Holy Cross. Because the course load and studying consumes so much of your time, you have to prioritize and make room for meetings, events, and time with friends. I feel comfortable keeping track of deadlines and schedules at work because I used that type of organization every day in college.

You also interact with alumni and professors so frequently at Holy Cross that you grow accustomed to speaking and writing professionally. I did not feel as intimidated once I started looking for a job because I was so used to corresponding this way.

What is the most important advice you could give a student on obtaining an internship or a job?

Someone once told me, “Don’t stress too much. You will get a job.” I definitely stressed, but they were right. It did happen, and it will happen for you. It might take a while, and sometimes you’ll feel frustrated and scared, but don’t give up. Also, don’t be afraid to say no to a job offer if it doesn’t feel quite right for you. You might apply to so many different jobs and go on so many different interviews, but remember that you’re also looking for a good fit for you. If something just doesn’t feel like the direction you want to go in, it’s ok to wait and try for something else. It’s also ok if you have no idea what you want to do. Any position you end up taking will help lead you to your dream job.

Revive and Refresh your Resume

February 17th, 2015 by rimaal17

Is your resume looking a little dull? Here are 4  tips and tricks we found helpful to boost your resume game!

1.) Job Description

If you can’t seem to describe your job/experience or are having a hard time remembering what you did, Google it. Hit the search tab and Google: “(your job) description” and see how others describe it. Maybe this will give you an idea. For example, this summer I was a hostess, but when I went into the Career Planning Center to add my new experience I couldn’t think of how to describe what I had done.During my meeting a career counselor gave me this simple idea, which is one of the most helpful tips I’ve ever gotten.

2.) Proofread!

You can never overly-check your resume for spelling errors, because spell check will not catch every mistake.

3.) Wording

Use present action verbs for current positions. (ex. “resolve” not “revolved” )

4.) Ordering

Keep your positions organized in reverse-chronological order by END DATE within each section.  Recruiters want to know what you’re currently doing or what you’ve done most recently, so make sure that’s listed first.